funnywildlife:

nom nom nom

funnywildlife:

nom nom nom

(via tiny-creatures)

instagram:

Seeking Inspiration Midair with @manonwethly

To see more of Manon’s artfully captured images of #flyingstuff, follow @manonwethly.

For Dutch designer Manon Wethlij (@manonwethly), the contents of her arresting #flyingstuff photos are less important than the conversations they provoke. “People are free to see or feel whatever they want in the shapes,” Manon says. “I love that they make people talk to me and ask questions.”

“I studied architecture for two years, then graphic design, but the thing that has always made me happy is photography.” When she found Instagram, Manon says, “it was exactly what I needed to keep my photography enthusiasm alive. I was taking lots of photos every day and just storing them in my computer for no one to see.”

These days, it’s the response to her photos on Instagram that keeps Manon evolving creatively. “Everybody’s enthusiasm encourages me to try new things,” she explains, “It’s sort of addictive.”

mangosandmulberries:

rawr0609:

yourlittleampersand:

Little Pop is shopping in the garden today in honor of National Eat Your Vegetables Day. 🐷🌽🐷🍆
source

Yes mr piggly wiggly sir

piggggggy

mangosandmulberries:

rawr0609:

yourlittleampersand:

Little Pop is shopping in the garden today in honor of National Eat Your Vegetables Day. 🐷🌽🐷🍆

source

Yes mr piggly wiggly sir

piggggggy

(via tiny-creatures)

griseus:

The spotted handfish (Brachionichthys hirsutus), an amazing creature that walks the ocean floor, is a rare Australian fish from the family Brachionichthyidae. It is classified as Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List 2002. is the first Australian marine species to be threatened with extinction.

The greatest threats to the handfish appear to be siltation and invasive species. The Derwent Estuary where the fish lives is highly urbanised and industrialised, and a range of marine pests have been introduced through shipping.  One key pest is the Northern Pacific Seastar (Asterias amurensis), a particularly large and voracious predator that is now abundant in the estuary. Studies by CSIRO show that the seastars eat the stalked ascidians that the handfish use to attach their eggs.

(via tiny-creatures)